An Inside Look at “Eyes of Truth” by Peter Mitropoulos

Image Courtesy of Rami Mehio

I’ve always been a fan of street art. Even in my younger years, I would enjoy looking at the graffiti in the streets of Athens. Art is a majestic way for people to express themselves. The first time I heard of JR and the Inside Out Project was the day after one of my good friends had received her self-portrait from JR’s New York studio and posted it on one of the main streets of northern Athens. It made quite an impression on me, so I did some research on JR and his TedX prize-winning wish.

A few weeks later, I was notified that Yvonne and Corinne were planning to take JR up on his offer and organize an Inside Out Athens Group Action called “Eyes of Truth.”  I thought their idea for the project was great and I they asked that I be one of the organizers for the project.  Being quite the social teenager, I was in charge of the youth section of the project, where I was to create awareness of the project amongst the younger Athenians, and promote others to take part in the group action. This was important to me, because I wanted to play a role in the project.  I wanted to be able to say that I made a difference.

Image Courtesy of Elias Mandouvalos

Right off the bat, many people began to show interest in the project and their willingness to attend the day of the posting. This only made me feel more and more obliged to promote the project. I felt eager to gather up as many people I knew, as many friends I could contact, and bring them all together to post the 76 black and white portraits. The majority of those who I contacted showed their support, and many people began to respond to the posters that I and the other junior ambassadors posted.

On the day of the posting, I did not really know what to expect and exactly how many kids would come. I felt confident though that the project would be a success. Ultimately, a significant amount of younger individuals attended the event, and for me, it granted a strong sense of personal satisfaction. I felt as if I was able to give back to my community just by playing a role in an art project. The feeling of achievement is definitely a hard one to surpass.

Image Courtesy of Elias Mandouvalos

Image Courtesy of Rami Mehio

I’ve always been a fan of street art. Even in my younger years, I would enjoy looking at the graffiti in the streets of Athens. Art is a majestic way for people to express themselves. The first time I heard of JR and the Inside Out Project was the day after one of my good friends had received her self-portrait from JR’s New York studio and posted it on one of the main streets of northern Athens. It made quite an impression on me, so I did some research on JR and his TedX prize-winning wish.

A few weeks later, I was notified that Yvonne and Corinne were planning to take JR up on his offer and organize an Inside Out Athens Group Action called “Eyes of Truth.”  I thought their idea for the project was great and I they asked that I be one of the organizers for the project.  Being quite the social teenager, I was in charge of the youth section of the project, where I was to create awareness of the project amongst the younger Athenians, and promote others to take part in the group action. This was important to me, because I wanted to play a role in the project.  I wanted to be able to say that I made a difference.

Image Courtesy of Elias Mandouvalos

Right off the bat, many people began to show interest in the project and their willingness to attend the day of the posting. This only made me feel more and more obliged to promote the project. I felt eager to gather up as many people I knew, as many friends I could contact, and bring them all together to post the 76 black and white portraits. The majority of those who I contacted showed their support, and many people began to respond to the posters that I and the other junior ambassadors posted.

On the day of the posting, I did not really know what to expect and exactly how many kids would come. I felt confident though that the project would be a success. Ultimately, a significant amount of younger individuals attended the event, and for me, it granted a strong sense of personal satisfaction. I felt as if I was able to give back to my community just by playing a role in an art project. The feeling of achievement is definitely a hard one to surpass.

Image Courtesy of Elias Mandouvalos